Make Your Own Mineral Foundation | U-Makeitup, Europe

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How To Make Your Own Mineral Foundation

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How To Make Your Own Natural Mineral Foundation

Why make your own mineral foundation?

Before the Industrial Revolution all food, beauty and personal care products consisted of natural ingredients provided by nature. Since the chemical industrial revolution of the 1940's and 50's we have been deluged with chemicals that disrupt normal functioning of the endocrine (hormone) system. Today in our modern world we find hormones in our meat, insecticides on our fruit and vegetables, harmful chemicals in our lotions and shampoos, additives in our sauces and packet food.

Makeup is no exception, the large cosmetic companies are amongst the worst offenders and you will find many potentially toxic chemicals and preservatives in labelled makeup. Commercially produced foundations often contain many undesirable ingredients which are known to be carcinogenics, irritants and comedogenic substances (clogs the pores of the skin). Foundation is a 'leave on' cosmetic product which is in contact with your skin all day and part of the evening. Your skin absorbs over 50% of what is put on it, so it is important to understand the ingredients.

Here Are Just A Few Of The Harmful Ingredients Commonly Found In Regular Foundations:

Talc: Also known as hydrous magnesium silicate, talc is used as a cheap filler and to absorb moisture.

Why is it bad? Studies by the National Toxicology Panel demonstrated that cosmetic-grade talc can be toxic and carcinogenic.

Mineral Oil: Often used in foundations to impart a smooth silky feel. Mineral oil is a mixture of aliphatic, napthalenic and aromatic liquid hydrocarbons derived from petroleum (Crude Oil).

Why is it bad? Mineral oil seals the skin like a plastic wrap, thereby disrupting the skin’s natural ability to breathe and absorb moisture. This can result in premature ageing of the skin and many other skin disorders. There is also strong evidence that mineral oil affects the human immune system and is a respiratory toxicant and allergen.

Preservatives: Look out for DMDM hydantoin, diazolidinyl urea, imidazolidinyl urea, methenamine, quarternium-15 and sodium hydroxymethylglycinate.

Why are they bad? All these preservatives slowly and continuously release small amounts of formaldehyde. Formaldehyde is classified as a known human carcinogen. Also watch for Thimerosol, a mercury-containing preservative. High levels of mercury can cause allergic reactions, skin irritation and adverse effects on the human nervous system. Studies have also shown that it can affect the reproduction system. 

Dioxin: You won't see the word Dioxin on a list of ingredients but it is often found in antibacterial ingredients and emulsifiers.

Why is it bad? Dioxin causes cancer, suppression of the immune system, nervous system disorders, heart and kidney disease, liver damage, miscarriages and birth deformity.

Bismuth Oxychloride: Used to help with adhesion and to add a slight pearlescent finish.

Why is it bad? Bismuth Oxychloride is not a toxic ingredient but it frequently causes irritation, itching, rashes and inflammation. Very bad for sufferers of acne and rosacea.

Synthetic Fragrances:  

Why are they bad? Synthetic fragrances can have as many as 200 chemical ingredients. On your label it will simply say "fragrance", so there is no way to know which chemicals have been used. Problems caused by chemicals used in synthetic fragrances include headaches, rashes, hyperpigmentation and skin irritation.

Aluminum Starch Octenylsuccinate: Used in foundation to prevent it from caking onto the skin, to lessen a greasy shine or to enhance the SPF factor. 

Why is it bad? Aluminum Starch Octenylsuccinate is an aluminum salt that can be toxic to the nervous system.

Propylene Glycol:  A petroleum derivative used in foundations to maintain a consistent texture and also as a moisturiser, skin conditioning agent.

Why is it bad?  Propylene Glycol is classified as an irritant and studies have shown concerns regarding cancer, developmental and reproductive toxicity, allergies and immunotoxicity. It can also enhance penetration of other ingredients, chemicals and toxins into the dermis as an absorption enhancer.

Isopropyl Myristate: A synthetic oil used in foundations as an emollient and thickening agent.

Why is it bad? Isopropyl Myristate is easily deeply absorbed by the skin, it is so deeply penetrating that it is also an ingredient used in multi-purpose rust remover. It is a fatty compound that can irritate the skin, cause allergic contact dermatitis and blackheads.

Parabens: Often used in foundations as preservatives. Look out for methylparaben, propylparaben, isoparaben, ethylparaben, butylparaben or E216.

Why are they bad?  Parabens are chemical preservatives that have been identified as estrogenic and disruptive to normal hormone function. Recent studies have detected the presence of paraben esters in 99% of breast cancer tissues.

Take some pure mineral ingredients, put them together and you have a natural mineral foundation with all the following benefits:

  • Healthier for your skin
  • Non-comedogenic (will not clog pores)
  • Anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial
  • Ingredients recommended by dermatologists
  • Water resistant for long periods of time
  • Suitable for all skin types
  • More than suitable for those prone to acne and rosacea
  • Labelled mineral foundations are extremely expensive, you can make better for a fraction of the cost
  • Learn to make your own pure mineral makeup and start your own business 

What equipment do I need?

  • Coffee Grinder (keep for mineral makeup use only)
  • Cling film to stop any powders escaping from  the coffee grinder
  • Measuring Spoons - see recipes
  • Small brush for taking powder off of sides of grinder
  • Protection for work surface
  • Dusk Mask for grinding powders
  • Apron
  • Surgical or Nitrile gloves
  • Pure Alcohol that you can buy from any chemist and some kitchen roll for sterilising equipment and tools
  • A piece of kitchen roll or white paper to test your foundation match
  • Sifter Pot or Container of your choice
  • Kabuki Brush to apply 

What Ingredients Do I Need?

The following mineral foundation recipes are all Cruelty Free and Vegan Friendly.

As everyone has a totally unique skin tone, it also follows that your foundation will be unique to you as well. This is the beauty of making your own, you can keep adjusting until you have the perfect colour match but this does require a certain amount of patience!

Mineral Foundations come in two parts; the white base and the colour part.

White Base:

Makes 16g or approximately 11 tsp of buildable medium coverage, matte, foundation base with good sun protection and oil absorbency. There will be spare foundation base left over, this can be used for blushers and correctors and also for lightening your foundation should it be too dark. The rest can be stored in a sealed bag or container for making more cosmetics at a later date.

For the Colour Part:

How To Make A Natural Mineral Foundation:

First The White Base:

Have everything prepared and close to hand.

Firstly, sterilise all equipment by wiping with Rubbing Alcohol and some kitchen roll. 

*Remember to wear a dust mask

Method:

  1. If the capacity of your coffee grinder is large enough, put all of the white base ingredients into it. If not then make in 2 batches by splitting the ingredients in half.
  2. Put the cling film over the top, replace the lid and grind for 1 minute giving the coffee grinder a little shake after about 30 seconds.
  3. Let the powders settle before opening, this will also rest the coffee grinder. Open the lid and brush any powders that have collected around the edges back into the middle. Grind again for 1 minute.

Your white foundation base is ready.

You will need 3 teaspoons of your ready made foundation base plus a little extra for adjustment, should it be necessary. Put the rest in a sealed bag or container and label.

Now For The Colour Part:

In the following recipes you will be adding the iron oxides/ultramarines but before you begin, if you have a favourite loose powder foundation that you are trying to match, smudge it into a piece of kitchen roll and rub into a circle. If your foundation is liquid then a white piece of paper may be better. Keep this as a reference to make a colour match.

Here are some example foundation recipes:

Light Mineral Foundation Recipe

*Remember to wear a dust mask

Take the 3 tsp of your white foundation base and put it into the grinder. In this recipe we are using our 0.05 ml mini scoop.

Method:

Add all of the coloured pigments above to your white base.

  1. Cover the top of your coffee grinder with cling film, replace lid and grind for 30 seconds.
  2. Wait for the powders to settle and check. Brush any powders that may have collected around the edges back into the grinder and grind again for another 30 seconds.
  3. Remove lid and make sure that everything is well mixed. Now smudge some into your kitchen roll next to the foundation that you are matching against, if you have one.

This may not be the perfect shade yet, so look at it and compare it to your swatch on the kitchen roll or try it on your face. Is it too orange, too red, not golden enough, too light, too dark etc.

See ‘Adjustments’ below to correct if necessary and if you do need to correct, remember to add, grind and smudge in small steps. Remember to make notes of any changes that you make to your recipe for future reference.

Example Medium Mineral Foundation Recipe

*Remember to wear a dust mask

Take the 3 tsp of your white foundation base and put it into the grinder. In this recipe we are using our double ended measuring spoon and our 0.05 ml mini scoop.

Method:

Add all of the coloured pigments above to your white base.

  1. Cover the top of your coffee grinder with cling film, replace lid and grind for 30 seconds.
  2. Wait for the powders to settle and check. Brush any powders that may have collected around the edges back into the grinder and grind again for another 30 seconds.
  3. Remove lid and make sure that everything is well mixed. Now smudge some into your kitchen roll next to the foundation that you are matching against, if you have one.

This may not be the perfect shade yet, so look at it and compare it to your swatch on the kitchen roll or try it on your face. Is it too orange, too red, not golden enough, too light, too dark etc.

See ‘Adjustments’ below to correct if necessary and if you do need to correct, remember to add, grind and smudge in small steps. Remember to make notes of any changes that you make to your recipe for future reference.

Tan Mineral Foundation Recipe

*Remember to wear a dust mask

Take the 3 tsp of your white foundation base and put it into the grinder. In this recipe we are using our double ended measuring spoon and our 0.05 ml mini scoop

Method:

Add all of the coloured pigments above to your white base.

  1. Cover the top of your coffee grinder with cling film, replace lid and grind for 30 seconds.
  2. Wait for the powders to settle and check. Brush any powders that may have collected around the edges back into the grinder and grind again for another 30 seconds.
  3. Remove lid and make sure that everything is well mixed. Now smudge some into your kitchen roll next to the foundation that you are matching against, if you have one.

This may not be the perfect shade yet, so look at it and compare it to your swatch on the kitchen roll or try it on your face. Is it too orange, too red, not golden enough, too light, too dark etc.

See ‘Adjustments’ below to correct if necessary and if you do need to correct, remember to add, grind and smudge in small steps. Remember to make notes of any changes that you make to your recipe for future reference.

Dark Mineral Foundation Recipe

*Remember to wear a dust mask

Take the 3 tsp of your white foundation base and put it into the grinder. In this recipe we are using our 0.05 ml mini scoop.

Method:

Add all of the above coloured pigments to your white base.

  1. Cover the top of your coffee grinder with cling film, replace lid and grind for 30 seconds.
  2. Wait for the powders to settle and check. Brush any  powders that may have collected around the edges back into the grinder and grind again for another 30 seconds.
  3. Remove lid and make sure that everything is well mixed. Now smudge some into your kitchen roll next to the foundation that you are matching against, if you have one.

This may not be the perfect shade yet, so look at it and compare it to your swatch on the kitchen roll or try it on your face Is it too orange, too red, not golden enough, too light, too dark etc.

See ‘Adjustments’ below to correct if necessary and if you do need to correct, remember to add, grind and smudge in small steps. Remember to make notes of any changes that you make to your recipe for future reference.

Adjustments:

Too orange - add ½ a mini scoop at a time of ultramarine blue, grind well after each addition, until you reach your perfect tone.

Too pink - add ½ a mini scoop at a time of chromium green, grind well after each addition, until you reach your perfect tone.

Not pink enough - add ½ a mini scoop at a time of red iron oxide, grind well after each addition, until you reach your perfect tone.

Not golden enough - add ½ a mini scoop at a time of yellow iron oxide, grind well after each addition, until you reach your perfect tone.

Too dark - add a little extra white base and grind well.

Too light - increase the colour part recipe ingredients by half again and grind well.

Once you feel that you have reached your target colour, then tip a small amount of foundation into the lid of the sifter pot and using your Kabuki brush, try it on your face starting at your chin line.

Finally: Feel free to experiment with different base powders to suit your needs. In place of the Matte and Shimmer Micas you might like to use Mica with Carnauba Wax or Dimethicone. Maybe you would like your foundation to be more oil absorbing, so you may choose to increase the Kaolin Clay a little. You will probably have to do a little colour adjusting elsewhere but this is all part of the fun of making your own makeup.

Also remember our skin is a different colour in the summer months to the winter months, so you can now make a summer foundation and a winter one.

Once you have made your first natural mineral foundation, you will never want to use anything else….ever!

copyrighted material of U-Makeitup

published 5th August 2013